Crazy Daisy's Personal Development Blog

A Rain of Grain

whole-grains

When it comes to finding healthy breakfast cereals, it can be quite a challenge. Many cereals are full of sugar and preservatives that pack on the pounds. Oatmeal is one of the only good cereals you can eat without feeling guilty. Oatmeal has been trendy with foodies and celebs for a while now, thanks in part to its rep as a low-fat, high-protein superfood. But here’s another reason to boil some water and make yourself a bowl tomorrow morning, oatmeal can keep you from packing on additional and unwanted pounds, according to a new study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition.

Researchers gave one group of study subjects oatmeal for breakfast, while a second group was served a ready-to-eat oat-based breakfast cereal. Both breakfasts clocked in at 363 total calories. When asked to rate their appetite at regular intervals after finishing, the oatmeal eaters described themselves as significantly less hungry and more satisfied than the cereal eaters—even up to four hours following their meal. Researchers think it has to do with the fact that oatmeal is thicker and delivers more filling fiber than other cereals. There are many different kinds of oatmeal on the market so when you choose one, try to stay away from the sugar.

Hummus

Hummus is a delicious type of food with a lot to offer. There are many hummus benefits that most people are not aware of. A few years ago, only the healthiest eaters even knew what hummus was—much less ate it on a regular basis. Now, the stuff practically takes up an entire section at the supermarket (despite the fact that a quarter of Americans still don’t know what hummus is). Here’s why the dip’s growing popularity is a good thing: People who regularly eat hummus tend to have smaller waists and healthier diets overall, a new study in the Journal of Nutrition & Food Sciences found.

The researchers pulled data about chickpea and hummus consumption from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and found that hummus eaters—63 percent of whom are female—take in 52 percent more fiber, 13 percent more good-for-you polyunsaturated fats (despite an overall lower intake of fat), and 20 percent less sugar than non-consumers. Plus, people who eat the chickpea-based dip are healthier eaters overall, packing in more servings of fruit, dark green veggies, and whole grains per day.

Not surprisingly, this translates to benefits you can see: Hummus fans’ waists are, on average, eight percent smaller than the waists of people who don’t eat the dip, the study found. They also tend to weigh less, even though they take in no fewer calories overall.

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